Author Archives: Lauren Mahieu

Getting the ROI on your genealogy subscriptions??

John M. Bursley with his regiment in History of the Fourth Regiment of Minnesota Infantry Volunteers During the Great Rebellion, 1861-1865

John M. Bursley with his regiment in History of the Fourth Regiment of Minnesota Infantry Volunteers During the Great Rebellion, 1861-1865, located with Mocavo.com.

If you’re like me, your email in-box is often crammed with offerings for the latest and greatest – books, websites, webinars, etc.  It usually takes a few endorsements before I jump on the bandwagon and subscribe to a new website, but I’ve recently added three subscription-based sites to my list – HistoryGeo.com, Mocavo.com and MyHeritage.com.  Am I getting my money’s worth from these new subscriptions?  What’s the return on investment?

Continue reading


Twenty Tips for Living with the Obsessed Genealogist

Posing for photos with tombstones is perfectly normal activity.

Me, Scooter Bug and Uncle Humphrey Stanwood in Bar Harbor, Maine – 2013.   See tip #18 below. (In case you hadn’t noticed.  I like the color pink.  And Poodles.)

  1. Once infected, always infected.  There is no cure for the genealogy bug.
  2. The ancestry.com subscription is non-negotiable.  Pick your battles carefully.
  3. Never, EVER throw away paper found on the office floor.
  4. Food.  Clothing. Shelter. Computer.  The basics of life. Continue reading

Julia Hanchet – Original Guardianship Document

This document was found while out shopping for antiques, and I couldn’t pass it up.  My attempts to locate descendants of Julia were not successful, so I’m hoping that one will find me so it can be returned to family!  The document is posted below along with the transcription:

Guardianship2

Nathan Kimball appointed guardian for Julia Hanchet

The people of the State of New York by the Grace of God free & independent – To all to whom these presents shall come or may concern, send Greeting – Continue reading


Tuesday’s Tip: HistoryGeo.com – You Can’t Live Without It!

Santiago_Homesteads_mapview

Using HistoryGeo.com, I was able to easily create this map on Google maps showing Benjamin Bursley’s residence in relation to those of his sons-in-law, Albert Stanwood and James Smallen.

Okay, it might not be as important as food, water, clothing or shelter, but if you are as into maps and land records as I am, then I’m sure you’ll agree – HistoryGeo.com is one of those “must have” subscriptions.  Here’s why:

  • HistoryGeo.com takes Arphax Publishing’s superb books, Family Maps series of Land Patent Books and the Texas Land Survey Maps, and allows you to search by surname, or browse by county, to find those who had land purchases indexed either in the U.S. Bureau of Land Management database or the Texas General Land Office database.
  • When viewing the digital map on HistoryGeo.com, links are included to the individual land owner’s BLM Document, and <DRUM ROLL>…..a link to the tract of land in Google maps!!!!!
  • For under $60, less than the cost of two books, you can have a one-year subscription to access the maps and detail contained in all 500 books published to date. Continue reading

Using DNA to answer: ARE YOU MY (great great great great grand-) MOTHER?

science_dna

In 2010 I took my first autosomal DNA test through FTDNA.  I quickly discovered the frustration of autosomal DNA testing.

1)  Autosomal DNA provides no hints as to what part of your family tree your match comes from.  Given that we each have 64 fourth great grandparents, 128 fifth great grandparents and so on, it can be quite challenging to determine which person is our common ancestor when a DNA match occurs.

2)  Not everyone who does DNA testing is interested in sharing.  That was quite a surprise!  I had always assumed that people who are willing to expend the funds for DNA testing would be similarly interested in collaboration.  WRONG!

3)  Not everyone who does DNA testing posts their family tree for self-exploration by those with whom they have genetic matches. Continue reading


Military Monday – Benjamin Bursley – Civil War veteran

With stories of pilgrims and Revolutionary War ancestors, tales of Indian uprisings and cousins scalped, its no wonder I became a genealogy addict at a very young age. My mother must have been quite astounded that her seven-year-old daughter repeatedly asked about her heritage. Mom’s usual response was, “You’re English, Irish, Scotch, Welch, German and Norwegian.”  She didn’t have much else to offer me, but my grandmother sure did. While we didn’t know WHICH ancestor came on the Mayflower, or who was in the Revolutionary War, we did know it was her mother’s Bursley side that was impacted by the 1862 Sioux Uprising in Minnesota. And, years later, I now know it was also the Bursley lines that had the Mayflower ancestry as well as service in the American War of Independence. So today, Veteran’s Day, I offer this tribute to Benjamin Bursley, my grandmother’s great-grandfather, Civil War veteran and descendent of some of America’s earliest settlers – the Pilgrims. Continue reading


Lemuel Bursley, Ensign, War of 1812

As Veteran’s Day is approaching, I thought it appropriate to share the Annual Return of the Company of Foot, commanded by Daniel Beale, in the War of 1812.  Included is my ancestor, Lemuel Bursley, whose father Benjamin Bursley served in the American Revolution.  The original document is held by the Farmington (Maine) Historical Society.

Daniel Beale's Company of Foot, serving in the War of 1812.

Daniel Beale’s Company of Foot, serving in the War of 1812.

 


Lavina Bursley Stanwood’s Photo Album – Mystery Persons!

My grandmother was captivated with the photo album she inherited from her own grandmother, Lavina (Bursley) Stanwood. Many of the pictures had relatives known to her; however, there were quite a few whose identities remain a mystery.  It is my hope that by posting these pictures here, someone will stumble upon these pages and be able to provide names for these unknown faces.

pg22unknown_male

Photograph of male in Anoka, Minnesota, presumed relative of Lavina (Bursley) Stanwood

The portrait above was taken at Nelson studio in Anoka, Minnesota.  Here is what is known:


They once were lost, but now are found….

Left, Clara (Sine) Bodine, Carrie (Niece) Cooper (back), Mary (Bodine) Niece Loudenberry (right), and Dorothy (Cooper) Dundas (front)

Left, Clara (Sine) Bodine, Carrie (Niece) Cooper (back), Mary (Bodine) Niece Loudenberry (right), and Dorothy (Cooper) Dundas (front)

Like most genealogists, I love old photographs.  When visiting antique stores, the shelves of old photos always captivate me, and I’ve been known to “adopt” a “homeless person” (i.e., a photographed person!) or two when there’s sufficient information on the photo to provide clues to the identify of those captured on film.  On one such occasion I was rewarded to learn my “adoptees” were the grandchildren of President Rutherford B. Hayes, and was able to donate the photos to the museum in Ohio.  What was rather curious was how the pictures of the two little boys made their way from Cincinnati, Ohio, to a small antique store in Temecula, California!

Two weeks ago while antiquing I came upon the photo shown above.  The owner of the photo not only documented names of the individuals on the photos, but included their relationships on the back: Continue reading


My photo restorations with OnlinePhotoFix.com

Everyone has them – old photos you’d love to frame and display, but which require restoration or touch up due to spots, water damage or simply wear from age and handling.  I’ve been busy sifting through many such pictures, trying to find just the right ones to add to my heritage wall, the focus of my living room.  We’ve hung our huge, antique map of Penobscot County, Maine, and now need other photos to surround it.

Our living room - a work in progress.  It needs an area rug, coffee table, and most importantly, family photos to surround our precious, 1859 map!

Our living room – a work in progress. It needs an area rug, coffee table, and most importantly, family photos to surround our precious, 1859 map!

Now that I’ve identified the pics I want to duplicate and frame, the dilemma has been finding someone reliable and dependable, preferably local, whom I can entrust with these priceless family treasures.  Since moving to Delaware, I didn’t have anyone that fit that bill, so I decided to find online solutions.  OnlinePhotoFix.com got good reviews, so I gave them a whirl with the two photos shown below: Continue reading


Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 66 other followers