Curio – the genealogist’s tool for organizing Evernote notes, Word and Excel files & more

Curio's Evernote tab let's you sort your Evernote notes by folder and tag so you can easily find the one you wish to import.

Curio’s Evernote tab let’s you sort your Evernote notes by folder and tag so you can easily find the one you wish to import.

Stuff. Yup, genealogists collect a lot of stuff. We save stuff from the web, stuff we’ve been emailed, and yes, stuff we’ve created.

Lots of my stuff is saved in Evernote. Lots of it is in Microsoft Word. Some of it is in Excel. (I live by my spreadsheets!) Of course, there’s stuff saved from online books, databases, microfilm images, digital maps, mind maps, charts, and graphs and…well…you get the picture. There’s S-T-U-F-F all over my hard drive.

Usually this isn’t problematic, but sometimes I forget what stuff I’ve already collected. Despite my best efforts at keeping notes and research logs, if something is out of sight, it’s out of mind.

That’s why I LOVE Zengobi’s Curio!!! It’s became my favorite Go To app – it’s a must-have, can’t-live-without app that lets me take all that stuff and organize it how I see fit. Best yet, it interfaces with Evernote, allowing me to drag my Evernote notes into folders or blank “idea spaces,” which are blank pages that can be utilized to save images or other information. (Unfortunately, the interface is only one way – you can save and view the Evernote page, but cannot update Evernote from within Curio.)

Mostly I’m using Curio to organize info. I am in the middle of tracing my Tibbetts family, a line which I’ve just begun researching.   Curio let’s me take all that info and organize it in folders or sections. So, when I find information from a book, I can either save it directly into Curio using it as a note, I can save the image on my hard drive and drag it into a Curio folder, or I can save the info into Evernote and place it in Curio….the options are quite varied. The bottom line is I can save the info however I like, in a format that makes the most sense for me.

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Tables allow me to organize my research and save short cuts to Word documents, Excel or other files on my hard drive for easy access and viewing.

What I love MOST about Curio is the ability to make shortcuts to documents on my hard drive. For example, I’ve created the tables shown above, and by holding the Option button on my Mac and dragging the file into the table’s cell, it creates a shortcut to the document.   When you click on the shortcut image, it launches the file in the associated application. In this instance, Word:

Click on a short cut launches the associated program and opens the file.

Click on a short cut launches the associated program and opens the file.

The possibilities for Curio are quite limitless.

In the middle of a photo preservation project, I decided I needed to remove the photos from my great-great grandmother Lavina’s photo album and place them in the appropriate archival sleeves and boxes. However, I did not want to lose the order in which the photos were placed in the original album, and I also wanted to be able to have a way to search info about them. For example, I wanted a format similar to a database design that would allow me to search for all photos taken at Nelson studios.   Curio lets me do just that.  Scanned images of the fronts and backs of the photos were saved in a Curio project:

Using Curio, I created a page for each photo in my great-great grandmother Lavina's photo album.

Using Curio, I created a page for each photo in my great-great grandmother Lavina’s photo album.

Curio  also allows you to create things. For example, to assist in unraveling the identities and relationships of five males named Nathaniel Tibbetts (two of whom also married women named Abigail), I created the following in Curio:

The following was used to capture the information known about five men named Nathaniel who lived in close proximity to one another

The following was used to capture the information known about five men named Nathaniel who lived in close proximity to one another

Want to create other images, such as maps or diagrams? No problem. Here are examples below of items that I easily created using Curio:

brainstorming

Relationships were mapped using Curio.  I also was able to insert this image onto another – see below:

 

Curio was used to create this map

Curio was used to create this map

As you can see, I’m kinda hooked on Curio . Not only can you save stuff, you can create some pretty cool stuff with it.  Nope, I’m not affiliated with them in any way. I’m just a very, very happy customer.

For those of you PC users, sorry, you’re out of luck. Right now, Curio is only available for the Mac.


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