U.S history – OUR history

A Patriot and a Red Coat in Concord, Massachusetts

A Patriot and a Red Coat in Concord, Massachusetts

My husband and I spent an awesome week in Boston, and enjoyed visits to Lexington and Concord, Cambridge, and my favorite town, Quincy. The latter included a tour of the homes where John Adams and his son, John Quincy Adams, were born, and concluded with a visit to “Piece field,” the enormous home where John and Abigail Adams made their abode after returning from Europe.

Reflecting on our nation’s history and the roles my own ancestors played in it, I’ve come to realize that U.S. history is now MY history. It is personal.

My ancestors were here during those early colonial years, and took an active role in events that shaped our nation. Not only did those events involve the men, but the women and children were dramatically affected as well; when their husbands went off to war, the women were left to carry on with her usual chores as well as maintaining the farm and managing affairs at home.

When I think about the sacrifices my forebears made for our country, I have to wonder – am I made of the same hardy stuff? Could I have endured the eight months my 5th great grandmother Sarah Day spent at home without word about her husband’s safety and well-being while he and the militia marched from Ipswich, Massachusetts to New York in 1776? Or when he was called to duty again in 1779 with his unit reinforcing the army under General Washington?

Yes, our ancestors, both male and female, have made many sacrifices to give us the freedoms and privileges we have in America today. For this I’m grateful and proud. I’m also cognizant that we have reached a crucial juncture in the 2016 election with two political candidates who have quite opposing values and world-views (not to mention political strategies). The outcome of November’s election will have a profound impact on U.S. history that has yet to be written. I’m sure I’m not alone with the sense of unease that often overpowers me when watching the evening news these days, listening to world events and thinking about the role our next President will play in them.    Our ancestors faced similar dilemmas in choosing the nation’s earliest Presidents; and like them, we must prepare for the upcoming election. We must cast our vote for the candidate we think will continue to move our nation forward to ensure our grandchildren and great grandchildren will be proud to be called Americans.


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