Author Archives: Lauren Mahieu

The new and improved Legacy Family Tree Webinars

New and improved Legacy Family Tree Webinar page

New and improved Legacy Family Tree Webinar page

Legacy Family Tree recently announced major changes to their web page, and the ability to listen to webinars on smartphones and mobile devices.  Whoo hoo!  With a 2 1/2 hour round trip commute daily, I immediately thought of the possibility of playing broadcasts while driving.  This morning I gave it a test run, listening to Warren Bittner’s excellent session titled, “Complex Evidence – What is It? How Does it Work? And Why Does it Matter?”

I was worried that my iPhone would lose connection and that the webinar would be challenging to listen to.  While there were occasional pauses while listening from my phone, they were exceptionally brief and were barely noticeable.  I’m thrilled that this ability is now offered, as I do most of my podcast and gene-learning in the car these days.  It’s now worth having an annual subscription, as previously I found I just didn’t have the time to listen when at home.  (Subscriptions are a great deal at only $49.95 per year, allowing complete access to the entire webinar archive, and yup, I’ve already resubscribed!)

Just as cool, their new website got a huge face-lift and is really user friendly.  It’s easy to find what you want to listen to.  I’m looking forward to a lot more learning!


Maine research: some lesser known places to search – for FREE!

I love Maine research.  The Pine Tree State has made major efforts to digitize their records, increasing the odds of finding your ancestors in both free, online databases and government repositories.  Additionally, I’ve found most town clerks and registrars very helpful and friendly, often willing to communicate via email regarding a research request.

Land Records

The state portal for the Maine Registers of Deeds is found here.

deedmap

Each county has various levels of digitization underway.  Kennebec County, for example, has indexed all of their deed books, including most historic deeds dating back to the late 1790s.   Continue reading


Petition for incorporation of Milo, Maine provides signature of Aaron Day

A visit to the Maine State Archives last week provided the following priceless document:

Signatures of those petitioning for the incorporation of Milo, Maine

Signatures of those petitioning for the incorporation of Milo, Maine

To the honorable Senate and House of Representatives of the State of Maine in Legislature assembled January 1823. Continue reading


Thank you Ancestry.com for a Day family reunion!

Ancestry.com – great for finding our ancestors, and spectacular for making cousin connections.

On February 2, 2014, I sent a message through Ancestry.com to Sherece Lamke, whose family tree contained information on Aaron Day and his wife, Martha.  What ensued after that initial contact was a flurry of emails back and forth, as we joyously exchanged information.  Sherece, who was significantly further along on tracing her Day family lines, generously shared with me the findings of consultants whom she’d paid to help break down brick walls.  Together, over the last 1 1/2 years, we’ve taken that initial research and have solved additional puzzles, having a blast along the way!  I’d hoped that one day we’d get to meet, and that day finally came!  Last Friday Sherece, accompanied by her mother and aunt, met my son and I in the small town of Readfield, Maine, starting off at the  Case Cemetery, where our 5th great grandfather, John Day, is buried.

Lauren and Sherece meet at Case Cemetery next to the gravestone of their 5th great grandfather, John Day

Lauren and Sherece meet at Case Cemetery next to the gravestone of their 5th great grandfather, John Day

Continue reading


The homestead of John Day in Manchester, Maine

For the genealogist, little can compare to finding the homestead of your ancestor.  And with the help of Dale Potter-Clark of the Readfield Historical Society in Maine that is exactly what we did!

This house is believed to be the homestead of John Day

This house is believed to be the homestead of John Day

First, some background:

On 24 October, 1796, John Day purchased from Benjamin Allen a portion of Lot 41, then described as Winthrop, in the County of Lincoln, Maine. Continue reading


Cynthia Sears Day, daughter of Aaron Day and Martha Tibbetts

Five years ago I took a DNA test with one goal in mind: to solve the mystery of Cynthia (Day) Bursley’s parentage.  If you’ve been following this blog, you know that the last couple of years I’ve been just a *tad* bit focused on researching Cynthia’s parents, and published a proof argument linking her to parents Aaron Day and Martha Tibbetts.  You can find posts about Cynthia’s parentage here, and the discovery of her mother’s maiden name here.

However, besides my own proof argument that demonstrated there was no other plausible set of parents for Cynthia, there was no paper that directly linked to her to this branch of the Days.   Until yesterday.  Well, it existed before, but I didn’t know about it!  🙂 Continue reading


Will the real wife of Aaron Day please step forward???

Call the genealogy police!  An impostor has posed for the wife of my 4th great grandfather, Aaron Day!    Who the heck is Marion Harris?  How on earth did she make it into SO MANY family trees???

46 Ancestry trees erroneously include Marion Harris as wife of Aaron Day

46 Ancestry trees erroneously include Marion Harris as wife of Aaron Day

Marion Harris was sneaky.  She saw an opportunity and she joyfully GRABBED it!  Continue reading